Visual Art

Tim’s Art

“If I can think it, I can draw it and I love coming to the Path with Art [Open Studio] Zoom meetings. It’s so nice to be able to be supportive of not only myself but of other people’s art and their different art making textures.”

—Tim Bridge, Path with Art Participant Artist

Join Tim and other artists during our virtual Open Studio on Mondays from 3:30-5:00pm for dedicated creative time and a supportive community environment!

Email program@pathwithart.org for the Zoom link to Open Studio.

Painting

Paulette paints Jimi Hendrix

This is a painting I made in a painting-from-a-photograph class with Pamm Hanson. I am a fan of Jimi Hendrix since I was a teenager. I have been trying to draw and paint his likeness for close to 50 years with no success. I learned a lot in this class and I feel as though I might be getting closer to my goal of capturing his essence in a painting or drawing.”
— student artist Paulette

Visual Art

Little Felt Bunny

Little Felt Bunny by Path with Art student artist Jessica Peterson

Path with Art participant Jessica Peterson shared a felted bunny she created with supplies from an art kit. She also wrote a poem inspired by this project.

Little Felt Bunny
How you make me smile
With your long droopy ears
And tiny bunny style
You sit upon my shelf
Keeping an eye on things
Acting as our herald
Ushering in the new spring
“I got to make this cute little felted bunny with the art kit sent to me. I ended up not making it into a broach but just a cute little bunny to sit on a shelf. I wrote a cheesy little poem to go along with it.”
Design

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

This Google Doodle is by artist Arron Croasdell, based in Dublin, and honors that beloved Irish holiday celebrated worldwide: St. Patrick’s Day.

Being an Irish designer, it’s so nice to
represent our national holiday on a global scale.”

The artwork features symbols that represent Ireland’s geography, architecture, and history. The first icon signifies the country’s verdant mountains, forests, and lighthouses. The imagery in the first “o” is a nod to the hands and heart of the legendary Claddagh ring, a symbol of love, loyalty, and friendship. The second “o” incorporates a vase holding Irish wildflowers — spring squill and crocuses — and a three-leafed clover, an emblem of Ireland that represents faith, hope, and love.

I want people to know
that Ireland is more than just
the stereotypes. It has a vibrant
culture and landscape, as well as
a thriving design and illustration scene.”

A depiction of the numerous rivers that run through many Irish towns and cities replaces the “g” as the “l” stands for Ireland’s woodlands, many of which are being restored thanks to reforestation efforts. Finally, the “e” is replaced by a Celtic knot, a symbol of hope in the infinite interconnectedness of humanity.

One of my ancestors was born on March 17ᵗʰ in 1764, somewhere in Ireland, so the holiday has a double meaning for me, a special significance. He came to America with his wife and two children in 1790.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Lá Fhéile Pádraig sona duit! Éirinn go Brách!