In The News

Art and September 11th

Artists, critics, and architects are discussing how culture responded and continues to respond to 9/11.

ARTnews has a story of how an immigrant from Korea uses intricate abstract works as a response. There is a write-up in the Village Voice on how the Tribute in Light memorial came to be. The architect of the transportation hub at Ground Zero tells Architectural Digest about how he conceived the design and how the city has changed. A piece in The New York Times looks at how art and artists struggle to contend with the horrors of that day. And, finally, a writer with the Art Newspaper spoke with artists about their memories of the event and how they responded.

“I wouldn’t say that the attacks had a big effect on my thinking so much as the amorphous and ambiguous war on terror and the authorization of military force giving the president unlimited power to wage war.”

Inspiration

An acclaimed painter from America’s past

Detail of a woman looking into a mirror from one of Pauline Palmer’s paintings
Detail from one of Pauline Palmer’s paintings

Pauline Palmer, one of the outstanding women artists in AmericaPauline Palmer was an American artist based in Chicago.

In 1919, Palmer became the first woman elected president of the Chicago Society of Artists. The New York Times, in 1938, upon her death, noted that many art critics celebrated her as one of the most important painters in America.

She was known for her portraits, but also did landscapes and still-life oils. Her work was widely exhibited during her lifetime.

Born in 1867, she died in Norway while on a trip to Europe with her sister.

Inspiration

Forgotten women artists

Marie-Gabrielle Capet, Self Portrait (1784)The wonderful and hard-working Ghaddra sent me this. It is about forgotten women artists, a series by the Journal of Art in Society. In this case, the focus is on a woman named Marie-Gabrielle Capet.

Marie-Gabrielle Capet, who painted the self-portrait to the left in 1783 or 1784, was a Frenchwoman from the city of Lyon.

“She came from humble beginnings, with both parents being servants. Little is known of her childhood, but it seems clear that she demonstrated considerable artistic ability from a very young age…”

I am amazed by her talent. At some point she moved to Paris.

Capet “attracted the attention of one of the great ladies of French painting, Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, who accepted her as a student in her studio. Marie-Gabrielle soon took precedence over Adélaïde’s numerous other female protégés. There were nine of these in total, collectively referred to as Les Demoiselles, and they included the talented Marie-Victoire d’Avril and Marie-Marguerite Carreaux de Rosemond.”

A highlight for me was a painting by Adélaïde — a self-portrait — in which she included two of her students, one being Marie-Gabrielle Capet.

I encourage everyone to look through the Journal of Art in Society for some great inspiration.

Thank you, Ghaddra, for sharing! Or should I say: ¡Gracias!

I love Spanish. It is such a beautiful language.

aaronjhill
blog editor and path with art ambassador
blog@pathwithart.org