Painting

A famous painting has been hanging upside down for 77 years

At least one art critic thinks it looks better that way. The piece is by abstractionist painter Piet Mondrian. It is unfinished and unsigned. I have actually put arrows with directions on my work to avoid this very problem. Maybe Mondrian just wanted to confuse people. I wonder if he would care. Would you be upset if someone displayed your art differently than what was intended? “It’s now part of the work’s story.”

Community · Visual Art

Exhibitions in 6×6 Format

Something I try to do in hopes of promoting my artwork is entering exhibitions. I’ve fallen behind in this practice, but now that my living situation is stable once again, I am returning to doing this. Finding exhibitions that are affordable can be difficult, as I have little money to spare. Despite that, I had prior knowledge of one that occurs annually and doesn’t have an entry fee that will break the bank: RoCo 6×6.

RoCo 6×6 is an exhibit that the Rochester Contemporary Arts Center has every year. Anyone can submit up to four entries, which are each to have surfaces that measure six inches by six inches. By “anyone,” I mean artists of all ages and skill levels, and from anywhere in the world. While there is no registration fee, most artists will have to pay shipping costs.

Why does this arts center have this exhibition? This event serves as their only fundraiser, as the center sells each piece of artwork for $20.00, both on site and online. Unfortunately, artists do not get a cut of these proceeds nor do they have any unsold artwork returned to them, as unsold pieces will continue to be for sale online at a discounted price.

To give you an idea of work that might be submitted, below are the four pieces I created.

“Union” by Angela Michaelina, March 2022
“Structure” by Angela Michaelina, March 2022

“Autonomy” by Angela Michaelina, March 2022

“Harmony” by Angela Michaelina, March 2022

Despite that, a week ago, I had learned from another Path with Art artist that there is a similar exhibition held by an organization in Shoreline, Washington, 6X6NW. This show allows for you to enter ten pieces of artwork, each on a six inch by six inch surface. Or if you are someone whose forte is in the realm of photography, you may enter ten photos that are to be displayed at eight inches by eight inches. While there is a $6.00 flat entry fee for registering if you are not a pre-K to twelfth grade student (and from what I interpret from the guidelines, you can submit both photos and artwork, yet you would pay $12.00, as the artwork and photos seem to be managed as two separate entities—contact the organization for clarification), I know that a portion of this blog’s intended audience can bypass shipping fees by dropping off pieces in person. Also, photo entries can be submitted electronically, each file needing to be at least 800 pixels by 800 pixels. 

While 6X6NW is similar to RoCo 6×6 in that you will not be returned any unsold artwork, a huge plus is that you can earn forty percent commission for your art that sells. Each piece is going to be sold at $36.00 during the time of exhibition, so you can earn $14.40 for each sold work. There also are awards given for People’s Choice, Sponsor’s Choice and Director’s Choice.

There is still time to enter the 2022 iteration of this show—for that matter, registration hasn’t even opened yet! Registration will occur in June 2022, so keep your eyes on their website!

History

“Remember the Ladies”

Painting of a young Abigail Adams on a book cover“IN THE SPIRIT
OF
CELEBRATING
OVERLOOKED CAREERS…”

A museum on the southern coast of Maine, in the small enclave called Ogunquit, is hosting a small exhibition of work by women artists dating from the first half of the twentieth century. Its title — “Remember the Ladies” — is a phrase borrowed from future First Lady Abigail Adams. She wrote it in a letter to her husband John, eventual POTUS, as he headed off to represent Massachusetts in the Second Continental Congress in 1776. “The exhibit places the artists in a continuum of American history that begins with the Revolutionary War era and continues to today.”

“Art made by women represents a tiny fraction of what contemporary museums show and collect. This has always been an unwavering prejudice, though in the late nineteenth century and for several decades thereafter change was in the air. Women achieved new levels of education and professional employment, and enthusiastically turned their attention to art. This show highlights a small group of artists who spent summers in Ogunquit, studying with Charles Woodbury, founder of the town’s first art colony. Because they made art their life’s work, these women were exceptional for their time.”