Opportunities

FREE Short Term Mentorships

Are you a Washington-based artist looking for a mentor?

Artists Up—a collaborative between the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, 4Culture, and Washington State Arts Commission—is connecting artists with mentors through Mentorly, an artist-owned and -operated online mentorship platform.

Apply for an Artists Up Mentorly Scholarship to receive 4 free online sessions with an artist-mentor of your choice. Mentors are available for:

  • Sculpture
  • Photography
  • Public Art Projects
  • Art to Facilitate Difficult Conversations
  • Fictional Writing
  • Teaching Art
  • Music
  • Dance and Choreography
  • Playwright
  • Theatre Production
  • Animator
  • Zine Creation
  • Woodcarving
  • Traditional, Cultural Art

The deadline to apply is January 30, 2023, 5 p.m. Pacific. Extra points are given to applications received early in the submission process, don’t delay. Under-resourced communities are encouraged to apply.

Apply for an Artists Up Mentorly Scholarship

In The News

Fair use or copyright infringement?

Andy Warhol's silkscreen prints from his Prince series, circa 1984, are based on a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith.
Andy Warhol’s silkscreen prints from his “Prince” series are based on a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith.

PURPLE FAME
In 2019, a federal judge ruled in favor of Andy Warhol and the foundation established after his death regarding the “Prince Series” of screenprints he made for Vanity Fair in 1984.

For $400, Vanity Fair licensed one of photographer Lynn Goldsmith’s black-and-white studio portraits of Prince from December 1981 and commissioned Warhol to create an illustration of Prince for an article published in November of 1984. He made 16 pieces in total. Goldsmith objected and sued.

However, Warhol transcended the photographer’s copyright by transforming a picture of a vulnerable and uncomfortable Prince into an artwork that made the singer an “iconic, larger-than-life figure,” the judge decided. The ruling was appealed by Goldsmith, “a pioneering photographer known for unique portraits of famous musicians,” and the case landed at the Supreme Court, where arguments have been heard. The court’s decision will likely be made public next year, in June of 2023.

Such cases fascinate me. Remember when artist Shepard Fairey was sued by the Associated Press for using a photograph of Barack Obama as the basis for his famous HOPE poster? That case was, thankfully, settled out of court. Who wants to be in protracted court proceedings for years and years? We have to wait and see what the court decides in the Goldsmith versus Warhol case.

Printmaking

‘There’s always a way when you’re an artist to find your way’

”Mixing her father’s negatives from the Great Depression with pictures taken on her iPhone, the master printmaker created a series of photopolymer gravures that expand the concept of family memorabilia.”

I find this fascinating.

Photogravure belongs to the intaglio family of printmaking. It consists of capturing an image on a plate that is printed by pressure through an etching press. Deceptively simple in theory, it is a photomechanical process of tactile delicacy and painstaking craftsmanship.”

I love her enthusiasm.

“There’s all this digital work that I love, but I really missed the physicality of making a print. With photopolymer gravures, you’re getting your hands inky and with those big prints… Oh boy! It’s so incredible and physical! You have to keep moving in order for everything to not smudge. You have to do everything very gingerly.”

Read more about the artist, Vaune Trachtman, at The Justice, an independent student newspaper at Brandeis University in Massachusetts.

Photography

An incredible reunion

A chance encounter brought a father and daughter back together again, sparking an extraordinarily moving journey of love and forgiveness in the face of mental illness, homelessness, and hardship.

While documenting homeless people on the streets of Honolulu, Diana Kim came across her own father. The man who she remembered abandoning her as a child was now homeless, unwashed, dressed in rags, and extremely thin.

Worst of all, he didn’t even recognize her. Read more about the emotional story to discover what happened next.

Community · Partners

The Art of Harborview Medical Center

I invite you to take a look at some of the artwork created by the talented staff of one of our amazing Social Service Partners, Harborview Medical Center. Click here for more inspiration for our upcoming Spring quarter photography and portraiture classes, as well as wood, fiber, jewelry, and much more!

Photography

“Structured in Seattle”

I took up film photography last year – it’s been a great way to explore both the city and my creativity.

Rebekah Zaharia, Academic HR Manager, General Internal Medicine

Portraiture

“Portrait of Sheryl Feldman”

Andrea Gahl, RN, Trauma Nurse Coordinator, Department of Surgery

This is a portrait of my friend Sheryl Feldman. She is a writer, filmmaker, climate change activist, and co-founder of Hedgebrook, a women’s writers retreat on Whidbey Island. 32×32, oil on canvas.

“Diamonds are MMs BFF”

Jamie Leeds, Program Operations Specialist
Supply Chain Management

“Gladys A. Bentley”

Nikki Harris – Dones, Medical Assistant Sleep Clinic

Gladys A. Bentley (Aug. 12, 1907 – Jan 18, 1960) “was a Gender-bending American Blues Singer, Pianist, and Entertainer during the Harlem Renaissance. She was a pioneer in pushing the envelope of gender, sexuality, class and race. ” She played a major roll early on the Black Queer community. This piece is mixed media of painting with pens, marker and paper.