Inspiration

An acclaimed painter from America’s past

Detail of a woman looking into a mirror from one of Pauline Palmer’s paintings
Detail from one of Pauline Palmer’s paintings

Pauline Palmer, one of the outstanding women artists in AmericaPauline Palmer was an American artist based in Chicago.

In 1919, Palmer became the first woman elected president of the Chicago Society of Artists. The New York Times, in 1938, upon her death, noted that many art critics celebrated her as one of the most important painters in America.

She was known for her portraits, but also did landscapes and still-life oils. Her work was widely exhibited during her lifetime.

Born in 1867, she died in Norway while on a trip to Europe with her sister.

History

“Remember the Ladies”

Painting of a young Abigail Adams on a book cover“IN THE SPIRIT
OF
CELEBRATING
OVERLOOKED CAREERS…”

A museum on the southern coast of Maine, in the small enclave called Ogunquit, is hosting a small exhibition of work by women artists dating from the first half of the twentieth century. Its title — “Remember the Ladies” — is a phrase borrowed from future First Lady Abigail Adams. She wrote it in a letter to her husband John, eventual POTUS, as he headed off to represent Massachusetts in the Second Continental Congress in 1776. “The exhibit places the artists in a continuum of American history that begins with the Revolutionary War era and continues to today.”

“Art made by women represents a tiny fraction of what contemporary museums show and collect. This has always been an unwavering prejudice, though in the late nineteenth century and for several decades thereafter change was in the air. Women achieved new levels of education and professional employment, and enthusiastically turned their attention to art. This show highlights a small group of artists who spent summers in Ogunquit, studying with Charles Woodbury, founder of the town’s first art colony. Because they made art their life’s work, these women were exceptional for their time.”

Inspiration

Forgotten women artists

Marie-Gabrielle Capet, Self Portrait (1784)The wonderful and hard-working Ghaddra sent me this. It is about forgotten women artists, a series by the Journal of Art in Society. In this case, the focus is on a woman named Marie-Gabrielle Capet.

Marie-Gabrielle Capet, who painted the self-portrait to the left in 1783 or 1784, was a Frenchwoman from the city of Lyon.

“She came from humble beginnings, with both parents being servants. Little is known of her childhood, but it seems clear that she demonstrated considerable artistic ability from a very young age…”

I am amazed by her talent. At some point she moved to Paris.

Capet “attracted the attention of one of the great ladies of French painting, Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, who accepted her as a student in her studio. Marie-Gabrielle soon took precedence over Adélaïde’s numerous other female protégés. There were nine of these in total, collectively referred to as Les Demoiselles, and they included the talented Marie-Victoire d’Avril and Marie-Marguerite Carreaux de Rosemond.”

A highlight for me was a painting by Adélaïde — a self-portrait — in which she included two of her students, one being Marie-Gabrielle Capet.

I encourage everyone to look through the Journal of Art in Society for some great inspiration.

Thank you, Ghaddra, for sharing! Or should I say: ¡Gracias!

I love Spanish. It is such a beautiful language.

aaronjhill
blog editor and path with art ambassador
blog@pathwithart.org