In The News

Fair use or copyright infringement?

Andy Warhol's silkscreen prints from his Prince series, circa 1984, are based on a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith.
Andy Warhol’s silkscreen prints from his “Prince” series are based on a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith.

PURPLE FAME
In 2019, a federal judge ruled in favor of Andy Warhol and the foundation established after his death regarding the “Prince Series” of screenprints he made for Vanity Fair in 1984.

For $400, Vanity Fair licensed one of photographer Lynn Goldsmith’s black-and-white studio portraits of Prince from December 1981 and commissioned Warhol to create an illustration of Prince for an article published in November of 1984. He made 16 pieces in total. Goldsmith objected and sued.

However, Warhol transcended the photographer’s copyright by transforming a picture of a vulnerable and uncomfortable Prince into an artwork that made the singer an “iconic, larger-than-life figure,” the judge decided. The ruling was appealed by Goldsmith, “a pioneering photographer known for unique portraits of famous musicians,” and the case landed at the Supreme Court, where arguments have been heard. The court’s decision will likely be made public next year, in June of 2023.

Such cases fascinate me. Remember when artist Shepard Fairey was sued by the Associated Press for using a photograph of Barack Obama as the basis for his famous HOPE poster? That case was, thankfully, settled out of court. Who wants to be in protracted court proceedings for years and years? We have to wait and see what the court decides in the Goldsmith versus Warhol case.

Artists · History · Visual Art

DailyArt Smartphone and Tablet App

top of DailyArt About screen, Android version 2.8.1
top of DailyArt About screen, Android version 2.8.1, screenshot taken by Angela Michaelina

Note: This is not a sponsored post, nor have I or anyone else associated with Path with Art have received any compensation for this. With that being said, please enjoy the following!

To those of you who have regular access to smartphones or tablets, have you ever downloaded any apps on a whim? I can’t even remember why I had visited the Google Play store to begin with, but I had downloaded an app a couple of weeks ago that might be of interest to you. This app is DailyArt.

DailyArt daily entry for "Black Cat on a Chair" by Andrew L. von Wittkamp
an example of a daily entry for DailyArt, screenshot taken by Angela Michaelina

The app’s name is an apt description of its function: each day, DailyArt shares a piece of artwork with its userbase, providing history and other relevant information about the work. The curators of the app aim to have a broader focus than just sharing well-known pieces by well-known artists, as they understand that if they were to dip into that pool only, then the works of many female artists and non-Western artists would go ignored. You can set the app to notify you once a day about new artwork, if you desire.

DailyArt Archive screen, Android version 2.8.1
DailyArt Archive screen, screenshot taken by Angela Michaelina

DailyArt has both a free and pro model, the pro model costing a one-time fee of $5.29. While the pro model removes ads (which are banner ads displayed at the bottom of the screen), grants you access to all archived entries, and allows you to favorite entries, the free model serves the app’s purpose adequately.

I share this information with you because I truly believe that many of you would find this app interesting. I regularly visit some servers on Discord (a chat application), and on one of these servers is a channel for discussing arts and crafts.

On another whim (which my life seems to consist a regular stream of these), I decided to share screenshots of the DailyArt entries in this channel. For a while, I assumed that nobody was paying much attention to these posts. But after a couple of weeks, another user mentioned how much she appreciated what I was sharing. Other channel visitors agreed with her.

Despite my experience with DailyArt being quite short, this app has been in existence for over ten years. Some of the daily entries I have seen this past week mention that there is a new version in development. I am not sure what this will entail and bring.

DailyArt can be downloaded from here for Android and iOS.

In The News

‘Battle to save quirky house that nobody knew about until owner’s death’

“𝖨 𝖳𝖧𝖨𝖭𝖪 𝖳𝖧𝖠𝖳’𝖲 𝖮𝖭𝖤 𝖮𝖥 𝖳𝖧𝖤 𝖳𝖧𝖨𝖭𝖦𝖲 𝖳𝖧𝖠𝖳 𝖠𝖳𝖳𝖱𝖠𝖢𝖳𝖲 𝖬𝖤
to outsider art: you feel like you’re seeing art in a purer, more primal form. An environment takes it to a different level. There’s a complete, one hundred percent commitment to whatever vision they’ve got because they’re sleeping it. They’re eating in it. And that’s quite a thing to behold. With environments like these, you get a complete work of art that somebody is living in and that they’ve established the rules. It’s like a personal universe.”

Community · Inspiration

Theme of Fall 2022: Falling Leaves

a watercolor and ink painting of golden and grey leaves by Angela Michaelina
“Falling Up” by Angela Michaelina

Hello, folks! Long time, no post. I hope everyone has been having a nice summer. I’ve been quite busy myself, hence my silence for the past couple of months. It’s hard to imagine that summer will soon be over. With that being said, fall will soon be here. What do you associate with this season? I imagine that these days, people would mention how there is pumpkin spice-flavored everything during autumn months. Though, there is another key trait that reminds people of fall: falling leaves!

We here who are managing the blog, Ambassadors, and other Path with Art players have decided to have a go at offering regular (perhaps seasonal?) themes to help inspire all of you fine folks and help generate some content for this blog. So, what does the former paragraph have anything to do with this? Well, the theme, courtesy of Bean Fairbanks, for this period is Falling Leaves.

In regards to this theme (and any future themes), you can submit any creative work to this blog relating to it, as long as the content adheres to the blog’s guidelines. For instance:

  • If you are a plein air painter or illustrator, you might want to share with us a painting or drawing that you did of the trees changing colors and dropping your leaves.
  • Or perhaps you like to collect dead leaves so that you can make collages, wreaths, or other crafts with them.
  • Maybe seeing the leaves in the breeze has inspired you to write a poem, some prose, or a short story about them.
  • Perhaps you want to make a simple mini-documentary of the changing foliage.
  • Or maybe you have been working on a podcast, and the topic of discussion pertains as to why deciduous trees drop their leaves.

The possibilities are endless (especially considering that you can be literal or unliteral as you want to be)! If you have any ideas, please send them our way. If you are uncertain as to go about this, refer to the submissions tab at the top of this page or e-mail us editors at blog@pathwithart.org, and if need be, we can aid you in this process.

Also, keep in mind that you are not limited or obligated to follow any themes that we present to you. You can submit material that is unrelated to the current theme at any time. We are happy to receive contributions of all types, as we want Path with Art participants of all types to be contributors to this blog.

So, to reiterate, the theme for fall 2022 for content to submit to the blog is falling leaves.

(By the way, if you have any ideas for future themes, feel free to share those with the editors, too!)