Poetry

“Autumn Longing”

I wrote a poem about fall. It was inspired by the theme of Falling Leaves and by Mary Oliver’s poem “Song for Autumn” and here it is:

“Autumn Longing”

It is time for bed,
It is time for rest.
Everything strives south,
goes down,
lets loose.
We all have gone to seed
Planting our hopes for next year into their prepared beds
No more roses only the ripe hips now
Now the feast from the harvest
Now the felling, the falling, the cutting
of expectation
as we curl in tighter
as we dig in deeper
we hold tightly to ourselves
in the wake of the coming winter
we long to close our eyes
as the sun sets ever lower in the sky

by Pauline Gates, PwA PA and AMB

Poetry

Falling Leaves

The leaves are so beautiful
in all their different
shades, shapes, and states
of growth, release, or decay.
Today I am thinking of the tree
That held that life in its existence,
nurtured it from before it was a small bud
carried nutrients to it so that it could survive
as it developed and grew
now the tree sends a signal
to each one
still connected
through that
nourishing network
to say, it is time, it is time to let go
the tree, feels, the moment
filled with fear or fascination as floating unfolds
It is time
It is time to let go

Neysa Peterson (she/her)
10-10-2022

Inspiration · Nature

Etching — what an art form!

An etching by Sheryl Steiger Young.

I came across this beautiful etching today. The artist is named Sheryl Steiger Young. The detail is amazing. “Fine line drawing and attention to minute detail characterize Young’s artwork.” Her animal etchings will be on display at a gallery in Vermont during the month of May. “The nature and animal studies are the root of her work, expressing all the perfection and beauty one could possibly be privileged to enjoy in the world.” I have done a few etchings myself, but nothing this intricate.

Nature

Blue shrooms?

Photo of a vibrant blue mushroom in a forest setting, surrounded by ferns.

E. hochstetteri is a mushroom, and it’s blue. It’s really, really, really blue—almost unbelievably blue, saturated in a way more often associated with kids’ markers or mouth-staining candy than with fungi. The diminutive mushrooms play an outsized role in New Zealand’s cultural landscape and also flourishes in locals’ lives, with the Māori using these mushrooms as food, medicine, and pigments for tattoos.”